Communism, Atheism and (maybe) Free Love

A gentleman's compartment and symbols

vmagazine:

Prune Nourry: Terracotta Daughters

In the continuation of her Holy Daughters project in India, Prune now reflects upon gender preference in China and infiltrates the local culture through the familiar symbol of the Terracotta Soldiers, by creating an army of 116 life-size Terracotta Daughters.

India and China alone represent 1/3 of the world population and both encounter a similar gender imbalance. This sociological phenomenon is due to the preference parents give to having a son. The number of single men has been increasing ever since the 80’s, and the misuse of ultrasounds to select the sex of the child. This leads to disastrous consequences for the situation of women in Asia (kidnappings of children and women, forced marriages, prostitution, population migrations. (full article)

Copyright © 2013 Prune Nourry. All rights reserved.

(via lustik)

myampgoesto11:

Tumblr artist Erin Tucker | Website 

untitled

paraffin wax, pigment

2013

Erin Tucker is a 2nd year MFA candidate in sculpture studying at Indiana University in Bloomington.

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peel-a-potato-with-a-potato:

mystrangesilhouettes:

A look in my dream house.

The books organized by color are very satisfying to me.

(Source: benimdetamisimvardiya, via thecurrentstoostrong-deactivate)

cjwho:

Hand Sewn portraits by David Catá | via

Does love really has to hurt? According to artist David Catá it obviously does. The Spanish artist uses his body as a canvas, writing an autobiographical diary. In his ongoing series ‘A Flor De Piel’, he embroiders portraits of people who have influenced or marked his life – family, friends, teachers, lovers, partners – sewn into the palm of his hand.

‘Their lives have been interwoven with mine to build my history’, Catá explains. ‘Every moment lived stays in the memory to finally be forgotten. Somehow, this fact is painful, since there are only material things and traces that people leave behind’. The woven flesh work establishes a symbiosis between union, separation, pain and love, a performatic and symbolic action of loss and preserves the memories through memorial, corporal and videographic footprints.

Watch the video below:

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